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planet. it happened in the past hour, nasa said the meteorite in russia had nothing to do with the asteroid, about the size of half a football field. joining me, astronomer david dundee. the question is, as i have just answered, there was nothing to do with the two of them one is more common than the other. meteorites in the sky of russia coming down. how rare is that? >> well, meteorite impacts happen all the time. the earth picks up tons of debris every day but it's usually in the form of dust and smaller objects. one the size of what we saw in russia is a once in a decade thing. last time this happened was about ten years ago, over in the pakistan, india region of the world. but the two objects are totally unrelated and one of the other big things to consider is that you're separating the two events by 14 hours. remember, the earth is hurling around the sun at 19 miles per second so we're in a different neighborhood than weapon the meet -- when the meteor came in in russia. >> that's interesting. everything's moving at once. how fast was this thing going? >> the top sea
are unrelated. nasa has been keeping a watch on this space rock for months t. came within 17,000 miles of earth. objects that size buzz earth about once every 40 years. >> this is a set of these asteroids and comites, even, that do occasional pass close to the earth across our orbit. we keep close track on those so we can predict when one might, some day, hit the earth. >> reporter: the best viewing was in australiaia and asia. but tonight, the space and science observetory will be open for people to get a look as it heads back to outer space. more details on today's event. scientists believe our solarsystem could have 500,000 or more asteroids, the size of the one that came chose to the earth today. fewer than 1% have been catalog. nasa spents $20 million a year on asteroid detection. as for the difference between a meteor and an asteroid, a meteor is an asteroid that comes into earth's atmosphere. go to our web site for more images and look at the images tab at the top of our home page. >>> hate today, authorities in southern california revealed fugitive former lapd officer dorner died from
. nasa reporting it appeared brighter than the sun. traveling at around 40,000 miles an hour, fast enough that if you were to hitch a ride, it would get from you new york to l.a. in four minutes time flat. early estimates were it weighed ten tons. nasa says now more like 7,000. it ripped through the air like a blade through fabric triggering sonic booms and an immense shock wave when it exploded. when it shattered miles above the earth, we're told it released 20 times the energy, more powerful than the hiroshimo bomb in japan. it was powerful enough to knock down doors and shatter windows across one city. officials say more than 1,000 people went for medical treatment. flying glass blamed for most of those injuries. one witness saying when older women in the neighborhood spotted it, they started screaming that the world was ending. and just about everybody seemed a little freaked out. >> it was very confusing because the building was shaking a little bit, so initially i thought it was an earthquake. but then i knew i heard this loud bang, so i thought some sort of explosion, either a gas
a shooting gallery around here. at the space museum a big show inside. a live nasa feed of the 2012 da14. it is 150-foot rock hurled across the night sky just before 2:30 our time. it was 17,000 miles from the earth before flying back into space. >> you see it going by so fast and realizing it is so close. it was amazing. >> it was amazing to see the damage it could have done. >> but it didn't. unlike in russia where they saw a blinding flash of light where a meteor unleashed sonic booms. 1,000 people were hurt from the flag fragments but flu debris and glass when the shock wave blow new windows of buildings. they told us that meteors come into the earth's atmosphere all testimony tie but blow up before they reach us. >> it is so exciting. >> people were fascinating not frightened. >> we did not run for cover. >> no word of any fatalities from the russian meteor and no reports of any satellites being taken out by the asteroid. they say today is a wake up call that we need to be more jidge lent about what is flying up around there. >> it turns out if s
apparently unfounded. nasa is using radar and other technology to study how the asteroid behaves, including its rotation rate, its composition and how it's impacted by the earth's gravity. the idea is to learn enough to prevent cat as it sfroe fee from it threatening in the future. >> we're going to get a lot of information about the asteroid. we're interested in its future motion, whether or not it could come back, whether it threatens the earth. >> reporter: the odds are either this one or another will be back. an asteroid impact the earth about every 120 years on average. it will be visible in the rthernemisphere this evening if you have access to a telescope. for now it's on its way away from the earth out into outer space harmlessly rotating -- or resolving -- excuse me. harmlessly rotating -- i can't even think of the right word. orbiting the sun. harmlessly at least for now, jim. >> casey, thanks very much. we appreciate it. ? or gal lat particular news, a meteor lit up the skies over eastern russia. the blinding light was followed by a series of deafening explosions. listen to this.
of collisions. >> reporter: aware, but how well is the world prepared? nasa budgeted $20 million last year to look for objects that may hit the earth but some scientists say more money should be spent on detection and ways to avoid a possible collision. >> we've gotten very good at finding the big things, the kilometer sized objects. we're working down to smaller objects. but there's many more of the small objects like these than there are of the big ones. >> i'd say the appropriate technology for deflecting a dangerous asteroid could possibly be a nuclear bomb, but the key is catching and detecting the objects early. >> reporter: experts say that friday's blast could have killed thousands of people had the meteor landed in the middle of a large city, a reminder they say that even smaller objects threatening earth should be a wake-up call. >> we knew factually we lived in a celestial falling rock zone, but friday taught us, reminded us that we live in a shooting gallery, in fact, we got into a crossfire. >> reporter: the power of the universe on display here on earth. michelle franzen, nbc
waves hit us. >> reporter: >> a nasa expert joined us on fox 5 news at 5:00 and said this is extraordinarily rare. >> i have to be honest, will. i am not wear of anything in the history books talking -- not aware of anything in the history books talking about this many people being hurt by a single event. >> ironically the event happened the same day an astroid buzzed by earth closer than an astroid has since scientists started monitoring them 15 years ago. it missed earth by more than 17,000 miles coming closer than weather and communication satellites that orbit our planet. >> they not related. they're going to do more studies, but right now nasa said they don't think it's related. >> so the meteor and astroid just a strange coincidence according to scientists. in case you're wondering as we did, what's the deal with all those dashcams in the cars of average folks like you and me? turns out they're popular in russia for several reasons including disputes over traffic accidents. insurance fraud is apparently a big problem there. we're also looking at how this story f
it in perspective for you, and it could enter the path some of satellites. what won't happen, nasa assures us, is this asteroid and, oh, yes, it has a name, called da 14, they say it will not hit earth. still, you cannot ignore the buzz around this out of this world event. so we have this whole team of reporters for you and analysts to bring you this historic moment. we have a so-called asteroid hunter, former astronaut, coming on live this hour and next to talk about really what will be a historic moment as 2012 da-14 brushes by us earthlings. that will start just about ten minutes from now. right now, i want to go straight to casey wian, live in pasadena, california, nasa's jet propulsion laboratory. and i imagine the excitement is palpable. they're tracking the asteroid. tell me where it is now. >> reporter: well, it is over australia, brooke. they are very excited here at jpl. it is a very, very big day. they have been tracking this asteroid for nearly a year. today is the day it is going to get closest it is going to come to the earth as you mentioned, 17,200 miles. and right now, it is
as an asteroid that came exceedingly close to earth, at least in space terms. as this nasa animation shows, the asteroid was just over 17,000 miles away from earth, traveling at about eight miles per second, actually inside a ring of television and weather satellites that surround the planet. named da-14, the asteroid was half the size of a football field. it passed, we can happily report, without incident. here to tell us about both events is astrophysicist and author neil degrasse tyson, director of the hayden planetarium in new york city. let's start with what happened in russia. how unusual was that in terms of size and impact? >> well, we couldn't know precisely how common that would be. all we can do is sort of look back at other sort of reported such events. for example, there was an air blast that happened in the airspace over india and pakistan back in 1990s. which happened to occur while they were in intense conversations about their nuclear buildup of arm ament. and so such a blast mimics greatly what would happened with the nuclear blast. it is an instant deposit of energy in t
to be amateur astronomers right now. those people have the most eyes on the sky. even nasa is looking at the skies but in terms of shear numbers, there are lots of people out in their backyards with telescopes looking up at the sky and this -- asteroid that missed us was discovered by amateurs. >> i knew save the world. dave mosier good to see you this morning. thanks for insight. appreciate it unbelievable video high speed police chase horrific ending. car crashing right into the cruiser. whole thing caught on camera. this happens way too much. and then for the first time in almost 600 years the pope has resigned. if you have got a lifelong career, like the pontiff, when is the right time to call it quits? fbn nicole petallides is here to talk about retirement coming up. hey nicole. she will be in here in a second. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. we don't let frequent heartburn
. and the meteorite that crashed into russia, why nasa thought it was bigger and badder than we first thought. >> a flash of light. >> just says after a huge meteorite explodes over russia injuring more than a thousand people there's word of another big fireball, this one streaking above california. trace gallagher live on the west coast with more, trace? >> reporter: they tell us that meteors are rare, but they're whipping around us. this person was driving 280 one of the areas around the bay area, a bright flash of blue light streak across. it's kind of hard to see the color on the video, but witnesses say this thing was a very bright blue and maybe it's just because of what happened in russia that we're watching the skies a little closer, but experts say this likely also could have been a meteor or a meteorite, but there were no reports of it exploding and no reports of it hitting anything, unlike in russia where this thing happened on friday and now, nasa is saying that it was bigger, faster and stronger than they thought instead of 50 feet, it was 55 feet. instead of 33,000 miles per ho
with the power of an atomic bomb, injuring more than 1,000 people, mostly from broken glass. n.a.s.a. said the meteor was about the size of a building and moving at 40,000 miles per hour. >> the recent occurrences isly what makes it interesting. it's definitely what has we up here. >> what do you know about astroids? >> i know they can be dangerous. >> meanwhile another astroid is passing very close to the earth. it's the closest any astroid has ever gotten to the earth. stargazers came out to get a glimpse of a fuzzy dot on a video screen. 17,000 miles seems like a long distance but it's so close the earth that astronomers see hits gravity has the potential of change its path. >> astronomers say it's a wonderful coincidence. reporting from the space and science center in oakland, i'm allen wong, abc7 news. >> if you snapped a picture of last night's youor, we would love to see it. just send it to us. >> if a meteor hit your home, are you covered by an insurance? michael finney got some answers. >> it is one of the things definitely covered under the homeowners policy. a lot of people does
bomb, injuring more than 1,000 people, mostly from broken glass. n.a.s.a. said the meteor was about the size of a building and moving at 40,000 miles per hour. >> the recent occurrences is probably what makes it interesting. it's definitely what has we up here. >> what do you know about astroids? >> i know they can be dangerous. >> meanwhile another astroid is passing very close to the earth. it's the closest any astroid has ever gotten to the earth. stargazers came out to get a glimpse of a fuzzy dot on a video screen. 17,000 miles seems like a long distance, but it's so close the earth that astronomers see hits gravity has the potential of pending it's path. >> astronomers say it's a wonderful coincidence. reporting from the space and science center in oakland, i'm allen wong, abc7 news. >> if you snapped a picture of last night's meteor, we would love to see it. just send it to us. u report at kgo-tv.com. >> it's certainly unlikely that a meteor would ever hit your home, but if it did, are you covered by an insurance? michael finney got some answers. >> it is one of the things de
? nasa says it was likely a meteor. not a space rock that streaked across skies over russia where 1,000 are recovering from injuries. the damage estimate for that, $33 million. and that happened on the same day that an asteroid half the size of a football field did a drive-by, passing 17,000 miles above earth. dr. hakin oleshegy is a scientist at the florida institute of technology and spokesperson for the science channel. nice to have you with us this morning. >> good morning. i'm happy to be here. >> first we need to clear up a few thing. initially we were calling that space rock in russia a meteorite. but it actually of an asteroid as well as the other one. >> well, you know, the naming of these rocks is kind of interesting, right? this object originated in the asteroid belt, so it is an asteroid. when it became streaking through our skies, we call it a meteor. then when it became a fireball, we called it a bolide. when the part hit the ground, fragments, we call those meteorites. >> i think i followed all that. >> yeah. >> you started off with the fact that it came from the aste
's atmosphere. it was traveling at around 33,000 miles an hour. nasa says the meteor released 20 amount the force of the hiroshima bombs. stress sweat. it's different than ordinary sweat. it smells worse, and it can happen any time -- to anyone! like when i fell asleep at movie night with all my coworkers and i totally dream snorted myself awake. i actually popped my head back so fast i'm pretty sure i have whiplash. stress sweat can happen to anyone, anytime -- and it smells worse than ordinary sweat. get 4x the protection against stress sweat. introducing new secret clinical strength stress response scent. ♪ starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. >>> federal prosecutors have charged former illinois congressman jesse jackson, jr., for allegedly misusing hundreds of thousands in campaign funds for personal expenses. jackson is said to be accepting a plea deal. his wife, sandy, faces one count of tax fraud herself. >>> in today's "office pol
saw something strange in the sky last night, a streaking flash of light. nasa tells us it could have been another meteor or some sort of space debris burning up as it entered the atmosphere. fortunately, nobody was hurt in california. >>> some new details about christopher dorner's last moments. an autopsy showed the former l.a. cop died of a single gunshot to the head. they say at this point it looks like it was self-inflicted. dorner locked himself in a cabin that caught fire during the final standoff with police. >>> a new pope before easter? could pop. pope benedict xvi will step down at the end of the month. current rules make march 15th the earliest possible date to pick a new pope but the vet kat says the date could be pushed up if all of the cardinals make it to rome early for a vote. >>> weary passengers from a carnival cruise ship "triumph" today are adjusting to being back on dry land with running water and working toilets. the passengers finally departed the crippled ship early friday in mobile, alabama, the more than 4,200 passengers and crew were then taken to new orlea
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)